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." and he would say "why would we want to be doing that now? that's actually going to hurt the economy." >> but hasn't our economy changed so much since franklin roosevelt simply put people on the government payroll? >> it's, economics, the underlying rules change a lot more slowly than people imagine. people look and they say, "oh, you know, back then they were taking ocean liners and now we fly jet airplanes." or, "back then we didn't have a global economy." actually, we did. it's a little bit fancier now. but the basic rules are not are not much changed. it takes hundreds of years for those to change a whole lot. and this is, i can pretty easily assemble a bunch of headlines from the 1930s and they will sound like they're right out of today's headlines. this is the same kind of animal that we confronted in the '30s. this is depression economics. and the nature of the solution is not really very different now from what it was then. >> what do you mean, depression economics? >> well, two things really. one is, a recession is when the economy's going down. a depression is when the econ
fiscal action that will push the economy back into recession. that was one of the risks that the fiscal cliff posed. the challenge is to achieve long run sustainability without unduly hampering the recovery which we have. the deal that was struck together with the previous work in 2011 that involved some spending cuts made some progress in both of these goals. sustainability still abil over the decade we have seen improvement in the debt to gdp ratio. there's more work to be done, but some progress there. and in the short run, the fiscal cliff deal on new year's eliminated a good bit of the restrictive components of the fiscal policy that would have had such adverse effects. not completely, but at least a good start. there was a bit of progress on both of these goals, very importantly. i hasten to say that we're not out of the woods, because we are approaching a number of other physical and critical watershed's coming up. we've got the funding of the government, the so-called sequestered, which is a set of automatic spending cuts that were delayed by two months as part of the fiscal cli
. >> on to business news now, the german economy contracted in the final quarter of last year as the eurozone crisis took its toll, but europe's biggest economy still managed to post modest growth of 0.7%. >> that may not sound like much, but it is more than you expect from most eurozone economies. >> the eurozone crisis has not been able to dampen the mood among eurozone consumers. they are still hitting shops and helping the economy grow modestly. >> despite big increases in the cost of energy, raw materials, and oil, private consumption is up. that is the first reason. the second is that the german economy remained competitive last year despite a weaker environment, and that has given exports a boost. >> exports are the backbone of the german economy. they continued to grow last year, albeit at a slower rate. companies are proceeding with caution. they are cutting investment amid uncertainty about what the new year will hold, especially for the eurozone. in 2011, the german economy grew by 3%. that figure dropped to 0.7% last year. the economy even contracted in the final quarter. the government
a gun laws is getting more pronounced. >> thanks very much from washington. will the german economy continued to slow? more on that later in this program. >> first, here's a look at some other stories making news. >> russian court has denied a request for leniency from a member of the punk band pussy riot. one member has sought a deferral of her presence sentence until her 5-year-old son turns 14. she was convicted of hooliganism after a protest during services in moscow church. >> the taliban have claimed responsibility for a suicide attack targeting the afghan intelligence agency. officials said two guards were killed when the bomber who blew up his car in front of the country's headquarters -- the interior ministry says security forces shot dead four other attackers. >> in iraq, more than 30 people have been killed in a series of attacks that appear to have targeted kurds. two car bombs exploded. one of them blew up outside a kurdish political party office. a third in a nearby town. >> the two biggest airlines have found their entire fleets of boeing 7873liner -- 787 dreamliners.
irreparable damage to the u.s. economy. >>> and jump t to the top of the ftse 100 after third quarter revenue beat the forecast, burberry had earnings higher than expected. >>> all right. sorted out my mike issues. "worldwide exchange" is slightly different today because we're analyzing the first german gdp numbers. >> and i come to the u.s. where it's all annualized and we stick to the european data and it's quarter on quarter. given the context, we're still working through what all that means. >> exports in november, down 94.1 billion is where we essentially went. 98.4 billion was the october numbers. so exports in november driving down. and that gdp number is worth pulling out. exports for the year, up 4.1%. as far as production is concerned, it was up 2% in november. but the forecast were for it to rise up 1%. it was a very weak october, as well. it was this production and that production number. when that came out, it essentially made people put a pretty fourth quarter in the whole, kelly. what we're trying to do is derive what the annual figure was. >> exactly. and before we get to that
parties are. >> they are going with the american economy and the global economy. closer you get to the fiscal cliff, i think the less likely it is that the u.s. will be funded over and. >> okay, let me ask about tax reform. mutual political last week that a balanced approach to placing the sequester with benefits and revenues should accelerate tax reform, and i believe it's fully possible this year we work on a bipartisan basis. how does that square with the people that say that the tax reform is going to lose out because of scheduling and needing to deal with the debt ceiling and the looming sequester and house republicans concerned that if they do anything on tax reform, that they may leave themselves open to the senate not taking action. therefore, they have taken in on popular vote for no reason. >> first of all we have to solve this debt crisis in terms of sequestration and in terms of the full faith and credit of the u.s. and. we are not going to accomplish tax reform in the next six weeks. so we have a deadline that cannot basically be moved for what we need to do in the
our economy, we can keep the sales tax flat at its current level and cut income taxes on our lower income working families to 1.9% and drop the top rate to 3.5%. this glide path to zero will not cut funding for schools, higher education or essential safety net programs. and for those who come to kansas or stay in kansas because of lower taxes, let me tell you, opportunities abound. an all-time record of more than 15,000 new businesses formed in 2012, a sign of strong economic growth. we are, as you know, the air capital of the world. our aircraft industry is back on the ascent, and southwest airlines is soon to land in wichita. we are the nation's breadbasket and its meat counter and are becoming its dairy section as well. our oil production is hitting a high not seen in more than a decade with billions of dollars of a new vertical and horizontal drilling. we are number one in new wind investment with nearly $3 billion of new investment last year alone and more to come. our rapidly growing animal health sector that stretches from k-state in manhattan to johnson county grabs a 30% o
and the economy. >> it's my pleasure to welcome you here to the brookings institution on a soggy day. it's not too hard to come in from outside on a day like this. this is the fifth growth through innovation forum that we have held at brookings but i'll give you a little background in a minute. it's the third one that we are conducting publicly. the phrase growth through innovation is an important part of the vocabulary to at brookings. we have what we call for institutional priorities under which we try to cluster all of the work that are more than 100 scholars do here. those for priorities are energy and climate, opportunity and well being, managing global change, and growth through innovation. this is i think exactly the right moment to be having today's event. we are in a period of transition in our national leadership here in the capital, of course. we have a new treasury secretary, chief of staff coming in. we'll be having a new commerce secretary, labor secretary, and, of course, the 113th congress is settling in on capitol hill. the forum is going to address the issues of how to reinvigora
in unemployment, and strength in manufacturing, has the u.s. economy has finally turned a corner? >> susie: and messy earnings news from two giant banks: a big earnings miss from citigroup, and a big earnings drop at bank of america. investors dump the stocks. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: hundreds of flights were canceled today and airlines rushed to make back-up plans after regulators around the world grounded boeing's 787 dreamliner. those actions came after the federal aviation association ordered the plane out of the air after two incidents where lithium ion batteries overheated. boeing says it is confident the 787 is safe and says it stands behind the plane's overall integrity. this is only the second time in more than 30 years that regulators have grounded a plane. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: boeing has spent more than $30 billion developing the 787 dreamliner. one reason for the high cost is boeing's decision to upgrade the hydraulics and other mechanical systems with next-generation technology that runs on electricity. >> you've got generators on boar
in unemployment and strength in manufacturing, has the u.s. economy has finally turned a corner? >> susie: and messy earnings news from two giant banks: a big earnings miss from citigroup, and a big earnings drop at bank of america. investors dump the stocks. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: hundreds of flights were canceled today and airlines rushed to make back-up plans after regulators around the world grounded boeing's 787 dreamliner. those actions came after the federal aviation association ordered the plane out of the air after two incidents where lithium ion batteries overheated. boeing says it is confident the 787 is safe and says it stands behind the plane's overall integrity. this is only the second time in more than 30 years that regulators have grounded a plane. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: boeing has spent more than $30 billion developing the 787 dreamliner. one reason for the high cost is boeing's decision to upgrade the hydraulics and other mechanical systems with next-generation technology that runs on electricity. >> you've got generators on boar
the world. china's economy rebounds into the fourth quarter, beating expectations and snapping seven straight quarters of slow growth. >>> the british government says there's no indication that the hostage crisis is over in algeria as the reports emerge that doesz may have been killed in a rescue operation. >>> investors are unnerved by big spending plans in 2013. plus, glencore pushes back its mega merger by weeks as the regulatory commission begin necessary south africa. >>> welcome to the program. i want to bring you some breaking news in terms of energy prices. the iea is out with its latest 2013 oil report. it expects u.s. oil demand to remain flat on the year. but the headline here does appear that the market, according to the iea language here, is tighter than we thought. all of a sudden, the market looks tighter than we thought. that's the main message we're getting from the organization. it says the world forecast to consume about 90.8 million barrels per day in 2013, up by about a quarter of a million since december. despite seeing the u.s. slight to even negative, seen as
.s. economy energized the stock market today. the dow jumped 85 points, the nasdaq added 18, and the s&p gained eight points. here's what inspired investors to buy stocks: housing starts surged more than 12% last month, hitting the highest level since june 2008. permits for future home construction were also the strongest in more than four years. the upbeat december performance echoes other recent measures on housing. and, there was also good news on the labor front: jobless claims fell last week to the lowest level in five years. >> susie: so is the slow growth environment coming to an end, or is the u.s. economy still stuck in neutral? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: ann lenane has sold real estate in up and down markets, what she says about today's market might surprise you. >> the real estate market is hot. it is on fire. >> reporter: her read on real estate market makes sense given that home sales and new construction are recovering from their recent steep declines. and, some economists believe housing will replace manufacturing as a key growth driver this year. beyond the hou
.5 trillion input into the economy, they help to maintain our social security system. we know that we're now a majority, children majority minority are being born inn now in the united states these kids will help beef up our social security system which we have got to strengthen right now. >> so you think looking at washington, that in this second term, the first year of the second term, the approximate it can deal with such important critical economic issues like raising the nation's set ceiling, but he can also deal with comprehensive immigration reform and also deal with the issue of gun safety out there, all three of these issues, do you think the president could juggle at the same time with congress? >> i know president barack obama, that's not the real question. the answer is yes, that's not the real question, the question is request the congress. remember the last congress was the least productive congress in 50, of years, maybe longer. and this congress has got to move in another direction, they have got to be able to chew gum and walk at the same time, yes, it doesn't feel like it b
technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. ro price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. ♪ >> money is pouring into dell. just in the last hour or so dell shares up 13%. onward pc maker may go private. dell talking to private equity firms. we will get the lowdown from a top analyst coming up in just a few moments. hello, i'm cheryl casone at last hour of trading and the "countdown to the closing bell" begins right now. dell is front and center in the market but also about apple. major supply-chain issues taking place at apple. the stock down nearly 3% trading at $17 down right now, still up $500. apple cutting back on orders from component maker iphone five screens by 50% in the first quarter alone which is usually a risk that demand is not what it was, especially in the developed markets. the iphone five was
and our economy. and finally, reform that recognizes the need for safety and security on our boarder and in our communities. with democrats and republicans recognizing the moral, economic and political imperative to create a 21st century immigration process, the 113th congress marks the best opportunity for broad immigration reform in nearly a decade. but for legislation to pass, it will take leadership. leadership from the administration, from congress and from faith, law enforcement or and business leaders at all levels. in each case the leadership that is needed must be strategic, disciplined and unified. our speakers today are exactly that; streej i disciplined and unified. our unity of purpose comes from the common crisis facing families and businesses in our midst and cuts across professional sectors, geographic regions, political stripes and religious beliefs. our consensus lies in a common belief that all americans prosper when we welcome immigrants and empower them to participate fully in our society. we have a broad, a range of speakers today from these three constituencies
downturn. the problem is the program has not worked well. it is not tied to the condition of the economy. it needs to be fixed. roseanne. -- >> roseanne. >> i am inspired. i want folks to understand they have to engage. they cannot trust those in washington d.c.. we have got to take control in our democracy. i want to talk about the fact this goes back to unemployment. it is a very easy read. it cuts to the chase in terms of facts that there are programs to get through and get 100% employment. do not discount america. take control of america. [applause] >> i forgot to mention, the book is called america's poor and the great recession. ideas about what democrats and republicans can agree on. speaker gingrich. >> thank you for assembling an amazing group and a fascinating evening. i hope everybody found it as intriguing as i did. it is clear our institutions and poverty -- institutions are not working. there is a need to rethink from the ground up and use all of the various technologies. then have a conference at the end and then give a major speak. i think we do not have the solutions in
such a strong economy, how can science correct this issue? because without cracking this issue i think having an illiterate society, a scientific illiterate society that affects the market demand for the science to come about. my friends who are not that scientifically aware, they just want a faster phone and want more pictures on facebook and they want a faster internet connection. what they don't want is a unified theory of physics. they don't want more nasa funding or anything about life. how this -- can science alone fix this problem or is it a bigger problem to society itself? >> huge issue. >> science can't fix big problems like that. they can help but i think the best thing scientists can do is make it more interesting in grades before imagination and creativity have crashed. largely -- 90% of the people educated -- that's what i never took a course in english at the university because i feared the deadening effect of the conventional view of literature. i'm glad i did it. i took the examination. >> it worked out pretty well for you. >> exactly. i'm how to write and i have my own idea
's stories. the big one, china aes economy rebounding in the final quarter of to 12. growth to 7.9%, up from 7.4% the appreciate quarter. economists do caution, though, that a chinese recovery is likely to be gradual and weak to drive a global rebound without improvement in the u.s. and europe. also, the fate of dozens of hostages in algeria is still unknown. the algerian military stormed a gas field where the workers were being held. six people if not more are believed to have been killed. >>> a team of experts from boeing and the aviation experts are arriving in japan today. today the japan transportation safety board released a picture of the battery. they said the battery was blackened and carbonized, had a bulge in the middle and weighed 11 pounds less than normal. >>> and the interview everybody is talking about, i stayed up late to watch it, lance armstrong telling oprah that he cheated. >> in all seven of your tour de france victories, did you ever take banned substances or blood dope? >> yes. i view the situation as one big lie that i've repeated a lot of times. i'll spend the rest
on the order of one, 1.5% visual, quite significant drag on economy. at the same time with quite a bit to do to address our long-term sustainability issues. a lot more work to do, let me be very clear about that. but it's going to be a long haul. it's not going to happen overnight. basically because the government budget represents the values and priorities of the public, and decisions been made about what to spend on, what you tax and so on are very difficult and contentious decisions that will take some time to address. >> well, those is to use -- those issues of course are not the specific purdy of the fed, and so why do we shift gears and talk more specifically about some things that the fed is doing and things that the fed might do. perhaps a way to introduce that is to say that the fed of course is keeping interest rates at close to zero since roughly 2008, and it dug pretty deep into its arsenal, more recently in terms of in particular the very massive asset purchases recently launched its third round, which are intended to bring long-term interest rates. can you tell us how well you
is happening over in europe. germany seeing a contraction in their economy. whether or not it is a recession still a little too early to say. as a result of what is happening in europe these stocks are down. gm was down over 4% today, big loss for the car companies because of europe. liz: and two vix etfs, volatility exchange traded funds, hitting new 52-week highs. even though the volatility index continues to tumble. what you see are two where you can make bearish bets on the vix, that would make sense, right? xiv, as you see. we've got them moving higher today. david: the battle over the debt ceiling and paying the bills that d.c. is racking up continues. representative jerry nadler, happens to be my representative, he is looking to stop future fights. he has introduced legislation to end the debt ceiling debate by getting rid of the debt ceiling all together. but would that give too much power to the president? that is the argument. that is the debate. we'll take you and jerry nadler there coming up. liz: germany's central bank pulling some of its gold out of new york and paris. we have
to disaster: how green jobs are damaging america's economy." in it, she subjects the assumption and policies which led to such a faded federal investments as solyndra solar panel manufacture as was that a 123 collector car battery manufacture to a waiting analysis which we of the institute have come to expect from this oxford trained economist who served as chief of staff for the council of economic advisers. sorry. during the administration of president george w. bush. in her book, she helps us understand why the failures of such direct investments in private firms are both significant problems in themselves and cautionary tales for those who would have the government rather than private investors allocate capital. the publication that regulates the disaster caps diane mr. shear as an institute senior fellow, i'll year in which has been prolific and influential. cited by reuters reporters, talk show host, across the country. i think in particular of her many, many contributions to our series called issues 2012, ranging from her analysis demonstrating that even adjusting for the state of the
that if the financial system collapses, the economy is likely to collapse. we took those actions, learned from what happened in the 1930's. during the 1930's, in part because the world was still recovering from world war ii one, there was -- world war i, cooperation among central banks and governments was not very good. your audience may know about the tariff wars and all the things that happened. in a global crisis like this one, it is important to cooperate, according it as much as possible with policy makers around the world. -- cooperate as much as possible with policy makers around the world. on one date, five or six of the world's largest central banks' coordinated on an interest-rate cut. we of work with the central banks to make sure that they have enough dollars to lend for banks that need to use dollars in their transactions. cooperation has been very helpful in the latest episode. one less thing that occurs to me. one reason that the fed and other policymakers did not take more aggressive fundamental action to try to end the great depression was, they were afraid to do anything that was
the economy, you know, recover as subsequently as well. i think that's what we've been seeing across the region as far as policies are concerned in that they are more responsive and more, i suppose, willing to adapt should be a quick change or shift in consumer sentiment because that will have an impact on growth very quickly in a subsequent month. >> seng wun, australia has had a difficult time determining just where their sector is heading in mining. is it simply now the onus is becoming more clear? >> well, yeah. i think the last six or eight months have given policymakers some degree of confidence in that the picture from europe is stable. the risk is fairly high, there will be more problems ahead, but the determination says policymakers in europe to stay on top of this situation, give confidence to policymaker here and the u.s. is -- and, again, asia, china, it's anchoring growth here and policy is coming up on china is also towards some degree of small, stable growth rather than full speed ahead. so that gets everyone else a little bit more flexibility with regard to fiscal pol
we can go back to the exciting ideas that can lead to the next waves in the economy. the other one is the political environment -- sorry. it can be hard to ignore, but were going to do it. another piece of the political environment, where we had the ability to fix the situation. we know to fix this. we needed a comprehensive dead deal that's big enough to stabilize the debt and we'll remember that. when you're trying to balance the budget. were not very. were not going to be there soon. you have to make sure that that's not faster than the economy and it's on a downward path and the problem is so big or too calm% year to look at every part of the budget. you have to look at defense spending. you have to clearly focused on health care costs, which go faster than the economy. we have to fix our social security system, which makes promises bigger than what we can pay out on the road. we have to raise revenues. we started down the path, but we haven't looked had to do about overhauling tax system, which would you want to raise revenue, you could do in could do in the way bad for the ec
. defaulting on our fiscal obligations would hit the economy harder than that cliff we narrowly avoided and will face again. a report put out by jpmorgan in 2011 exploited the myth going around a few missed payments would be no big deal. they said any delay by the treasury would have ripple effects similar to the aftermath of the lehman brother collapse. not sure that's true but it's serious. this is all caused by the dell ceiling. the u.s. is the only other country other than denmark that uses this tool. that's why ben bernanke has joined critics questioning why the u.s. needs a debt ceiling. >> i think it would be a good thing if we didn't have it. i don't think that's going to happen. i think it's going to be around. but i hope that congress will allow the government to pay its bills. >> ron brownstein is cnn senior political analyst and editorial director at the "national journal." good to see you. the public debt stands at more than $16 trillion. in and of itself it may not be as serious a problem as some make it out to be, especially when it costs the government about 1.8% a year
stronger in the second half. >> for the economy? i think we have to divorce the economy from the market. >> have we been price thatting that out? >> we have to be clear that markets are totally different from the economy. for the markets, we're looking at 2% scenario. scenario a would be similar to 2012 where i think actually the economy doesn't do that well. the first half is difficult. second half is a bit better. we've still got the fed printing 5 billion a month. we could see a rerun of 2012. maybe mid to single high digit returns. >> did you get exposure of citi to bofa here? >> we wouldn't be. we're taking a little bit of money off the table or indeed i think we did. the level of implied volatility makes perfect sense here. >> we'll leave it here for now. thanks very much. over to you, ross. >> kelly, thanks for that. so we are just about an hour and 20 minutes into the trading day here in europe. you can see advancers just about outpace decliners by a ratio of 6 to 4 and we're up near the high point of the session which has dragged us back into prospect on that particular indices
for the global economy. then the free money on the sidelines thanks to the federal reserve and bankers globally. what sectors lead? >> check off all those boxes that you mentioned. last week we had a flow of funds for the first time in three years. back into equities. it was the largest amount in eleven years. there's trillions of dollars on the sidelines, maria. that's the fuel for my secular bull market. and leadership is definitely financials, health care, consumer staples, consumer discretionary, industrials. i just love the marvegt. >> you know, ralph, it's pisani, treasuries have had negative returns so far this year. maybe if this continues through the quarter and all of those get negative returns on their mutual fund reports for the first time in ages, they be that would be the catalyst. >> rick santelli, the time i was in the sick bed we had a wild ride for the treasuries. back to a midpoint range now. what are the markets telling you these days? >> i think i agree with jim bianco. if you look at a 20-year chart of dell, we haven't spent time over 20 since '08. we haven't spent time ab
, and that has helped. it's going to be a decent year. i don't think the problem is the trajectory of the economy. i think the question is how much will these issues from washington, whether it's the debt ceiling, the sequester, the lingering uncertainty over the long-term budget picture undermine confidence, lower the valuations of u.s. companies because people just have less confidence in long-term trajectory. >> jared, president obama starts his second term next week. his inauguration, of course, monday. what has he done right in the last four years, in your view, what could he have done better or has he done wrong? >> four years ago right around this time when i was a member of the administration's economic team i was remembering just the juks of position about the great hope and expectations and just the real horror of what was going on in macro economy. gdp contracting at 9%, losing 700, 800,000 jobs per month. i think the president came in and hit very hard and broke the back of the great recession a lot sooner than people expected, certainly the financial markets were reflated much more q
having different task force for the visa according to the economy? >> there has to be away -- a lot of our laws date back to the 1950's. some to the 1960's. there has to be a way of bringing it up to date. those are things that will have to be negotiated. all be just say it can't managed by a central system in washington where washington decides how many nurses we need, how many farm workers. business will have to play a role and business will have to be the determining factor in order to make this work in a practical way. >> think for a man and that 10,000 people a day retire in the united states, seven days a week. we are a nation with unemployment and with a shortage of people that go to work at specific jobs. the secretary's point is on target. if you try to do this with an overseer of exactly how many left-handed nurses and right- handed carpenters get into the added states, we are doing the wrong thing. we need to do it on demand. if we have an extraordinary need to be competitive, and many, because of the price of energy and the fact the country is probably will have and have
coming this week. joining us now is jeff clinetopp at lpl financial. on the economy, dick hoey. jeff, it's going to start with you because i'm interested to see we could have not just a lower than expected increase in earnings this year, but maybe even a negative year since aus thegs companies and profit margin is were peaking. is it possible the s&p earnings do not grow this year? >> there's a distinct possibility earnings don't grow. our expectation is they grow a very small amount, but a lot of that is coming from share buyback these year. this quicker alone is a testament to that. this fourth quarter, supposed to be the lowest earnings dollar total for any of the quarters of last year. that's not the way it's supposed to work. fourth quarters is supposed to be the highest earnings total. but we've got that uncertainty lingering for 2012. this week, we'll hear from a lot of the fms. they have the highest earnings expectations for 2013. mortgages are doing well. but the less favorable -- >> and we know how difficult it has been to grow revenues year over year. so that's difficult and y
, the campaign rhetoric is getting hotter. reporting on the condition of germany's economy, the economics minister was keen to take as much credit as possible for record employment numbers, rising income, and falling debt. >> it is no accident that our economy is in good shape. it is no accident that new jobs are being created every day. they were created by the efforts of the german people, but they were also created by this governing coalition from >> but the opposition social democrats promptly pounced on the economics minister's claims. >> if you had anything to do with economic growth, then you have heard growth even more than you have hurt your own party's election results. >> the man who hopes to take chancellor merkel's job later this year accused her of failing to recognize the dangers of an unrestrained financial system. >> for too long, the government has tried to pretend it is all just a debt crisis of other individual countries, but that is only part of the story. now the truth is going to hit you in german taxpayers where it hurts. >> merkel and her cabinet are now hoping ec
on the condition of germany's economy, the economics minister was keen to take as much credit as possible for record employment numbers, rising income, and falling debt. >> it is no accident that our economy is in good shape. it is no accident that new jobs are being created every day. they were created by the efforts of the german people, but they were also created by this governing coalition from >> but the opposition social democrats promptly pounced on the economics minister's claims. >> if you had anything to do with economic growth, then you have heard growth even more than you have hurt your own party's election results. >> the man who hopes to take chancellor merkel's job later this year accused her of failing to recognize the dangers of an unrestrained financial system. >> for too long, the government has tried to pretend it is all just a debt crisis of other individual countries, but that is only part of the story. now the truth is going to hit you in german taxpayers where it hurts. >> merkel and her cabinet are now hoping economies across europe will start to pick up before th
of the issues, regulatory issues and housing was really good today. the economy is feeling better and investors aren't feeling bad. earnings numbers pretty solid so people are voting with their dollars right now. things are positive. >> for how much longer, mike? you have to admit, a pretty good run for a while now. are we due for a pullback of some kind? >> due for a rest or a pullback, would i say, but i don't think it's anything that looks like it has to be too dangerous. in addition to all the things michael is talking about, the market's refusal to go down when everybody else is saying it's overbought, probably contributed to the fact that we have this give up move higher. chatter today that maybe the republicans won't go down to the wire and contest the debt ceiling increase. all these things have swept away a lot of nagging concerns and the next thing to worry about is people don't know exactly what the next thing to worry about s is. >> let's turn it over to you. what are you expecting throughout the rest of this earnings season. we haven't had any major blowoffs, but we're not talking
thanks to the health and safety executive and the european union. the british economy is very reliant on small and medium businesses far less able to cope with bad regulation particularly when it's badly administer inside the u.k. >> my honorable friend is absolutely right. businesses large and small are complaining about the burden of regulation. not just the burden of regular ration from europe -- regulation from europe, but more generally. and that is why we should be fighting in europe for a more flexible europe and a europe where we see regulations come off. but the view of the party opposite is sit back, do nothing and never listen to the british people or british business either. >> order! >> here on c-span2 we'll leave the british house of commons now as today move on to other legislative business. you've been watching prime minister's question time aired live wednesdays at 7 a.m. eastern while parliament's in session. you can see this week's question time again sunday night at 9 eastern and pacific on c-span. and or for more information go to c-span.org and click on c-span se
similar things and have also had some success in creating more monetary policy support for the economy. >> you had mentioned that there has been evidence that the longer-term interest rates have come down to the initial round. concern is that the unemployment rate remains very high and activity would try to bring that down and one would hope to see additional movements from the most recent round. are you suggesting that one would need to be patient? needs a little bit more about how you would assess how this is having the kind of effect that you would anticipate? >> well, we will be doing that on a regular basis. we will be looking at the impact on financial markets and we will see some effect there. we will look to see whether or not the labor market situation. we first started talking about a .1% on employment, there has been some movement. there was nearly 40% of the unemployed having been out of work for six months or more. that is a situation where there are too many people i can give you specific criteria except to say that we will be assessing the impact of our actions a financi
about the u.s. economy, the turning in the house prices, europe, for example, these things will make an extraordinary amount of money even if they require more capital because banks are extremely leveraged institutions. and you only need a small amount of top line growth for them to make a lot of profits. >> if you to pick u.s. banks versus the rest of the world, what do you like for 2013? >> it bizarre thing is that last year everybody was upset about the masters of the universe and were talking up their retail and sort of consumer arms because credit losses were falling. interestingly, this year i suspect bank with more exposure to independent banking will probably do a lot better much to the chagrin of politicians i suspect. why is that? the m&a pipeline's looking all right. u.s. economy's looking slightly better. and we're still pre-basal 3. >> we'll leave it there. lex on wex, can we use that? >> yeah. >> is that all right with you? >> fine by me. >> lex on wex. >> stuart, thank you very much. we will be talking later about divestment. merger and acquisition activity this year d
sensitive to the economy commodity in the world. ip took out a lot of capacity. ip is a genius. this company's had an unmitigated run. capacity's constrained, prices going up, 95% of capacity. that is like -- you can put the price increase after price increase, that says the economy is much stronger than expected. this is the first commodity to raise prices big when things get better. they're raising prices consistently. very bullish. >> that is a great, great tell. still more to come this morning. get ready for an ipo hat trick, sunco energy partners, norwegian cruise lines, all making their debuts this morning. stick around to see how they open for trading. the opening bell is just a few minutes away. what are you doing? nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. ♪ [ indistinct shouting ] [ male announcer ] t
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